How to Get Those Delightful Dark Orange Yolks From Your Backyard Chickens

Orange yolks from backyard chickens

If you asked most people what color egg yolks are, they would likely answer yellow. Yolks have always been associated with the color yellow, which is unfortunate because backyard chicken keepers know better. Backyard chicken keepers know that yolks can and should be a bright, bold orange, and those bright, bold orange yolks are a sign of a happy, healthy hen.

Last year, I compared my pasture-foraging, insect-pecking, soil-scratching, whole grain-feeding chickens’ yolks to the yolks of both their “free-ranging” and factory-farmed counterparts. The results were clearly visible: Yolks from my homegrown eggs were not only darker, but also fuller and thicker. Even the eggshells were denser and harder to crack.

But what’s the big deal about orange yolks?

Besides being a coveted color, orange yolks are an indication of a well balanced and highly nutritious diet. A few things factor into the making of an orange yolk: xanthophylls, omega-3 fatty acids, and meats.

Xanthophylls are a class of carotenoids. Carotenoids are natural plant pigments found in many fruits and vegetables. It’s often thought that beta-carotene, one of the more well-known carotenoids, is responsible for giving yolks the orange pigment that people associate with carrots. But in actuality, beta-carotene benefits yolks nutritionally, rather than colorfully. The carotenoids that cause deeper yolk coloring are xanthophylls, which are more readily absorbed in the yolks. (Lutein is one such xanthophyll, and a lot of lutein means a lot more orange.) Xanthophylls are found in dark leafy greens like spinach, kale and collards, as well as in zucchini, broccoli, and brussels sprouts.

Omega-3 fatty acids are highly concentrated in flax seeds and sea kelp, which are both important components of my homemade whole grain chicken feed.

And did you know that chickens are not meant to be vegetarian, no matter what your premium carton of organic/grain-fed/cage-free eggs tells you? Chickens are omnivores by nature and their healthiest diets include meats, such as mealworms, beetles, grasshoppers, grubs, and whatever creepy-crawly they can pull out of the ground. I’ve even heard of chickens (those ballsy ones out in the boonies) attacking small rodents and snakes!

When you have all of these sources incorporated into a hen’s healthful diet, the nutrients they consume are passed on to their eggs and concentrated in their yolks. According to Mother Earth News, which conducted its own egg analysis, and a more recent Pennsylvania State University study, pastured eggs contain higher levels of vitamins A, D and E; more beta-carotene; and more omega-3s.

All this means is that a pastured egg is better for you. And that’s one of the reasons we raise chickens, right?

So, how do we get those delightful dark orange yolks from our backyard chickens?

Let your ladies roam a pasture (or a garden — especially if you’re digging over new beds — or even just a new patch of dirt in their chicken tractor) for an orange-boosting bug buffet.

Give them plenty of fresh greens to increase the lutein in their yolks. The darker the green the better, so I often fix them a feast of edible amaranth (one of my favorite summer greens), kale, collards, broccoli leaves, or whatever I happen to have growing in my garden. If it’s the middle of winter and your garden greens are lacking, you can feed them alfalfa.

They’re very handy helpers at the end of the season when most of my greens have bolted and become bug-ridden. Let the chickens clean up those plants before you pull them out for your compost pile. It’s a win for everybody! (Except the bugs, that is…)

Let your chickens clean up end-of-season plants

Xanthophylls in dark leafy greens give your eggs darker yolks

(As an aside, don’t be fooled by the cheater method that egg factories take, and simply feed your chickens more corn. While corn can give your yolks that nice golden color, it has little nutritional value.)

After a few weeks, you’ll be so used to seeing orange yolks (the way most of us have been conditioned to see yellow yolks) that you might even think they haven’t changed in color. Buy some eggs from the store and crack them into a bowl with your homegrown eggs — you’ll be stunned at the difference!

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March 7 2013      38 comments     Linda Ly
Gallinas

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  • http://www.facebook.com/rhonda.cooke.5 Rhonda Cooke

    Hi Linda. Do you store any of your chicken garden veggies for the chickens during the winter months? If so, how do you do it?

    • http://www.gardenbetty.com/ Linda Ly

      No, because I still get plenty of fresh greens in my garden over the winter. Some of them are left over from summer/fall, so as they start to bolt, I pull the entire plants and give them to my chickens. I also feed them all my weeds.

  • Angel

    What about the fact that most, if not all, alfalfa is GMO in the United States? Healthy chickens eating horrible GMOs doesn’t seem like a great thing. What should you feed them then?

    • http://www.gardenbetty.com/ Linda Ly

      For backyard chicken keepers, I consider alfalfa to be a last resort if you can’t source fresh greens for your chickens. If you don’t grow your own greens, you can buy overstock produce from farmers’ markets or even a place like Whole Foods, which would ordinarily just throw them away.

      • Angel

        Thanks! That is a great suggestion! We don’t have any chickens yet, but I want to learn everything possible right now!

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