Collecting calendula seeds and fresh eggs from the garden
Random Thoughts

Five Things Friday

The five little things that made my week…

1. Collecting calendula seeds and fresh eggs from the garden. One of the new hens has started laying those beautiful brown eggs, but as I haven’t caught her in the act yet, I don’t know who it is!

Collecting milkweed seeds

2. ’Tis the season for more seed collecting. These milkweed pods remind me of dandelion seeds with their silky fluff. Did you know you can start milkweed seeds from now until early fall? Doing so while the soil is still warm allows their roots to develop before the first frost hits (if your area has frost). The plant’s hardiness, and its value as a habitat for monarch caterpillars, makes it a great choice for a perennial garden.

Overgrown garden bed with tomatoes, tomatillos, and squash

3. At one time, this bed had neatly spaced rows of vegetables. Then I let nature (and a few volunteer plants) take over and my crop yield has never been better! The plants don’t last as long this way, since squash is prone to powdery mildew in my climate, but they’re thriving in this food forest interplanted with herbs, flowers, and other vegetables I’ve let go to flower. (Because with squash, the more flowers they have around, the more they’ll produce!)

Heirloom tomato harvest

4. This is just a fraction of what came out of that garden bed above. Thirty-five pounds of heirloom tomatoes, all started from Baker Creek seeds.

Summer berry harvest

5. It’s been a berry good season so far for our strawberries, mulberries, blueberries, and pink blueberries. Add yogurt and granola and that’s my breakfast in that bowl.

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  • As always, your pictures are stunning. Calendula seeds are one of my favourite to collect. When I was little I was afraid of them because they looked like little caterpillars 🙂

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