Sandstone monuments of Bryce Canyon
Outdoor Adventures, Snow Play

Bryce Canyon In Winter

Winter in Bryce Canyon National Park (or more accurately, spring in a heavy snowfall season) is magical for many reasons — the red rock amphitheater gleams beneath a coat of white; the sandstone arches, windows, fins, spires, and bizarre rock forms called hoodoos look even more surreal; the blanket of slushy snow dampens the trills of nature; and the usual crowds of visitors are gone, leaving you with a sense of solitary quiet in this monumental space.

On a road trip through Utah in late March, I put on cross-country skis and set out for Fairyland Point to explore the canyon rim.

Bryce Canyon City

Cross-country skiing to the canyon rim

Burnt forest tree

Bryce Canyon amphitheater

Bryce Canyon in winter

Bryce Canyon in winter

Bare tree roots on an eroded canyon slope

Standing on the canyon rim

Sandstone hoodoos

Sandstone hoodoos

Sandstone formations

Sandstone formations

Sandstone formations

Sandstone hoodoos

Bryce Canyon City

Bryce Canyon in winter

Bryce Canyon National Park

Sandstone tunnel

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