Balsamic strawberry jam on Freshly Preserved Ideas
Canning, Freezing & More Preserving, Recipes

Balsamic Strawberry Jam on Freshly Preserved Ideas

The strawberries at my local farmers’ markets are going strong right now, and I can never resist picking up a few baskets after the vendors ply me with samples and smiles. My favorite way to eat them is right out of hand, or sometimes crushed with a little sugar and ice.

But seasonal strawberries are fleeting, so I try to save a bit of that fresh, fruity flavor for winter when I’m longing for summer berries.

Fresh strawberries

This balsamic strawberry jam adds a savory note to the traditional preserve, making it suitable for charcuterie spreads as well as grilled pork tenderloin, fruit vinaigrette, and anywhere you want a rich, bold flavor with a touch of sweetness. Get the recipe here or keep scrolling to learn how to make your own.

Hulling strawberries

Hulled strawberry

Balsamic Strawberry Jam

Makes 4 half-pints

Ingredients

2 1/2 pounds strawberries, hulled
2 1/2 cups sugar
3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions

Prepare a water bath canner, along with four half-pint jars.

Prepare your jars in a boiling water bath

In a large non-reactive pan, use a potato masher to mash the strawberries with the sugar. Let sit for 15 minutes.

Crushing strawberries

Place the pan over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring frequently to prevent scorching. Continue cooking at a rolling boil until it reaches 220°F or the strawberries have thickened and reduced in volume, about 15 to 20 minutes.

Bring the mixture to a boil

Boil until the consistency thickens and reduces into a jam

(Optional: To test for gel without a candy thermometer, dip a metal spoon into the strawberries and lift the spoon out of the steam. Tilt the spoon on its side. If the jam “sheets” off the spoon, rather than dribbles like a syrup, gelling point has been reached.)

Use a spoon to check for gelling

Skim off any foam as needed. Remove the pan from heat, then stir in the vinegar, lemon juice, and pepper.

Ladle the jam into the prepared jars, leaving about 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe the rims clean, then seal with lids and rings.

Ladle the jam into your prepared jars

Savory strawberry jam

Process the jars for 10 minutes, adjusting for altitude as necessary.

Homemade balsamic strawberry jam

This is the second recipe I’ve developed for Ball Canning. (If you missed the first one for quick pickled roasted beets, you can find it here.) All summer long, I’ll be sharing a series of simple recipes for preserving your favorite produce, some with no boiling water bath needed!

You can find more recipes on their Tumblr page, Freshly Preserved Ideas, and their newly launched interactive canning map.

We have a busy and exciting month ahead because on July 22, 2016, I’ll be hosting a special Facebook Live event in partnership with Ball Canning to celebrate their sixth annual International Can-It-Forward Day.

My event will benefit Enrich LA, a local nonprofit that builds edible gardens for schools, so be sure to mark July 22 on your calendar, “like” Garden Betty on Facebook, and watch the event when it happens at 12 pm PT. Stay tuned for more details in the coming week!

Yield: 4 half-pints

Balsamic Strawberry Jam

Balsamic Strawberry Jam
Strawberry jam is a classic preserve, but if your taste runs more on the savory side, try this twist on the original. Here, balsamic vinegar and black pepper temper the sweetness of the berries while adding a deeper layer of flavor that works equally well on a plain piece of toast or a fancy charcuterie platter.
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Additional Time 25 minutes
Total Time 55 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 pounds strawberries, hulled
  • 2 1/2 cups sugar
  • 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions

  1. Prepare a water bath canner, along with four half-pint jars. 
  2. In a large non-reactive pan, use a potato masher to mash the strawberries with the sugar. Let sit for 15 minutes. 
  3. Place the pan over high heat and bring to a boil, stirring frequently to prevent scorching. Continue cooking at a rolling boil until it reaches 220°F or the strawberries have thickened and reduced in volume, about 15 to 20 minutes. (Optional: To test for gel without a candy thermometer, dip a metal spoon into the strawberries and lift the spoon out of the steam. Tilt the spoon on its side. If the jam “sheets” off the spoon, rather than dribbles like a syrup, gelling point has been reached.) 
  4. Skim off any foam as needed. Remove the pan from heat, then stir in the vinegar, lemon juice, and pepper. 
  5. Ladle the jam into the prepared jars, leaving about 1/4 inch headspace. Wipe the rims clean, then seal with lids and rings.
  6. Process the jars for 10 minutes, adjusting for altitude as necessary.
This post is brought to you by Ball Canning, for whom I’m a paid ambassador. Thank you for supporting the brands that support Garden Betty.

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