Recipes / Fermenting & Pickling

4 Ways to Pickled Green Tomatoes

4 ways to pickled green tomatoes

I am drowning in tomatoes. Crunchy, tart, green cherry tomatoes.

Correction, I was.

By the time you read this, I’m well on my way to Pagosa Springs, Colorado, via a 10-day-ish road trip through Utah, Arizona, Colorado, and New Mexico.

But this road trip was the impetus for the mad harvest last week of my rogue tomato plants, which have been exploding with fruit all summer long.

When you’re away for 10 days, things on the home front can feel a little stressful.

5Green tomatoes on the vine
End-of-season unripe tomatoes
Backyard harvest of unripe tomatoes

Who will water the garden, who will weed the beds, who will check for pests and trim off the dead stuff and pluck all the ripe veggies so they don’t waste away?

When I saw the hundreds of green tomatoes hanging off the vines, just days away from ripening, my other thought was — who will eat all of that?!

And so, just three days before I was set to leave, I spent a sweaty afternoon picking as many green cherry tomatoes off my plants as I could, hoping to preserve them so I wouldn’t come home to a mass of over-ripened, rotting fruit.

The final tally came to 55 pounds.

When you’re talking about cherry tomatoes, 55 pounds is a lot of tomatoes. I nearly tweaked my back hauling the harvest from the garden up to the house. (I know, I know — cue the violins.)

Related: Grow Tomatoes Like a Boss With These 10 Easy Tips

55 pounds of unripe tomatoes
Mountain of green unripe cherry tomatoes

Since I didn’t have time to get creative and whip up some relish or chutney, I decided to pickle all of them, thinking I can always turn those preserved tomatoes into relish later on.

And because I was canning up a storm (32 quarts in all), I pickled them four different ways so I wouldn’t get too sick of them come next summer.

Read more: 8 Canning Tips and Tricks for Modern-Day Home Canning

Guess what everybody’s getting for Christmas this year?

Jar of pickled green tomatoes
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4 Ways to Pickled Green Tomatoes

Makes 1 quart

Ingredients

1 pound green slicing tomatoes (or 1 1/2 pounds green cherry tomatoes)

For the Brine
1 cup white distilled vinegar (5% acidity)
1 cup water
1 tablespoon kosher salt

Basic Pickling Spice Mix
1 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds
1 teaspoon celery seeds
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns
1/2 teaspoon whole allspice

Dilly Garlicky Pickling Spice Mix
2 teaspoons dill seeds
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
1 bay leaf
4 garlic cloves, peeled

Hot ‘n Spicy Pickling Spice Mix
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
1 teaspoon Szechuan peppercorns *
1 teaspoon brown mustard seeds
1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Curried Pickling Spice Mix **
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1 teaspoon curry powder
1/4 teaspoon cumin seeds
1/4 teaspoon whole allspice
3/4 inch fresh ginger, sliced into thin coins

Instructions

Cut larger (slicing) tomatoes into 1/2-inch wedges, and cut smaller (cherry or grape) tomatoes in half.

Green tomatoes ready for preserving
Pack jars tightly with green tomatoes

In a small saucepan, bring all of the brine ingredients to a boil and stir until the salt is dissolved. Remove the brine from heat.

Fill a hot, clean quart jar with the pickling spice mix of your choice. Pack the jar tightly with the tomatoes.

Bubble the jars with a chopstick to release trapped air bubbles

Pour the hot brine over the tomatoes, covering them completely and leaving 1/2 inch headspace.

Stick a chopstick or “bubbling” tool into the jar and move it around to release any trapped air bubbles.

Pour the hot brine over the tomatoes
Leave 1/2 inch headspace in the jar

Wipe the rim clean, seal with a lid and band, and process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes (adjusting the time for altitude as needed).

Quick tip: Due to limited space on my stovetop, I now use this electric water bath canner and I wish I’d found it sooner!

Canning often takes up all the space in my kitchen so no one else can cook while I’m in there. The electric canner makes it possible for me to move the water bath process to the end of a kitchen counter, dining table, patio, or anywhere I have access to a plug.

In the summer, I like to set up my canning station outside so I can also enjoy some fresh air while keeping the house cooler.

There’s a drain spout on the side so you don’t have to lift a huge, heavy pot to pour it out, but this spout is also great for dispensing drinks.

If you need to make a large batch of a hot beverage (spiced apple cider, for instance), you can heat it up in the canner and use it as a convenient, mess-free serving station (no more ladles going in and out of a slow cooker). Such a plus in my party book!

Green tomatoes in pickling brine

Store the jar in a cool, dark place. The green tomatoes will be perfectly pickled in about two weeks.

Add them to sandwiches, hot dogs, burgers, steaks, potatoes, or anywhere you would normally use relish. For a unique kick, you can even top off a Bloody Mary or dirty martini with a pickled green tomato garnish!

Recipe notes

* Szechuan peppercorns can be found at well-stocked Chinese or Vietnamese supermarkets in the spice aisle.

** When making curried and pickled green tomatoes, bring the brine ingredients, brown sugar, and curry powder to a boil. Stir until the spices dissolve completely. Fill a hot, clean quart jar with cumin seeds, whole allspice, and ginger coins; pack the jar with tomatoes; then pour the hot brine mixture over the tomatoes.

Pickled green tomatoes
Jars of pickled green tomatoes

Common questions about green tomatoes

Is it safe to eat green tomatoes raw?

Absolutely! Green tomatoes (as well as tomato leaves) are edible, raw or cooked. They’re completely safe to eat and — contrary to popular belief — no part of a tomato plant is poisonous.

As with any vegetable, the key is consuming green tomatoes in moderation (especially if you’re sensitive to acidic foods).

What do green tomatoes taste like?

Green unripe tomatoes are tart, acidic, and slightly astringent, depending on how young the tomatoes are. They have a firm, crunchy texture, and lack the juiciness of mature tomatoes.

While green tomatoes can be eaten raw, their astringency mellows out when cooked or canned.

What’s the difference between a green tomato and an unripe tomato?

Certain heirloom varieties of tomatoes (such as Green Zebras) start out green on the vine, and stay green when fully ripe. As they mature, their flavor sweetens, their pulp softens, and they become juicier inside, all while remaining green outside.

Unripe tomatoes (across all varieties) start out green as well, but turn any shade of pink, red, yellow, orange, purple, or black as they develop.

Pickled green tomato recipes use green unripe tomatoes, as their natural tartness complements the punchy flavors in pickling spices.

How can I get my pickled green tomatoes to stay crunchy after canning?

If these pickled green tomatoes are too soft for your liking after going through a boiling water bath, try skipping the boiling water bath and making them as quick pickles instead. Simply pour the hot brine over the tomatoes and spices, let the jar cool at room temperature, and store in the fridge.

Or, you can add Pickle Crisp (food-grade calcium chloride) to your jar, following the recommended package amounts.

If your pickled green tomatoes are mushy, the problem may be in the quality of green tomatoes used. Always start with firm, fresh, unripe tomatoes that were harvested before the first frost. (A freeze will turn tomatoes mushy, even if they appear fine on the outside.)

Unripe tomatoes left on the counter for a few days will also begin the process of ripening (and softening), so it’s best to use them as soon as you pick them.

What do you do with pickled green tomatoes?

Here are some of my favorite ways to use pickled green tomatoes in my everyday cooking: charcuterie and appetizer boards, potato salads, macaroni salads, green salads, salad dressings, burgers, hot dogs, sandwiches and wraps, tacos, rice and noodle bowls, bloody mary cocktails, and dirty martinis.

I also have lots of suggestions for using the leftover pickle brine here!

Canning Sources

4 Ways to Pickled Green Tomatoes 1
Ball Wide-Mouth Quart Jars | Ball 4-Piece Canning Utensil Set | Ball FreshTech Electric Water Bath Canner
Yield: 1 quart

4 Ways to Pickled Green Tomatoes

4 ways to pickled green tomatoes

Turn an excess of green, unripe tomatoes into pickled green tomatoes with your choice of four different pickling brines.

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 15 minutes
Additional Time 14 days
Total Time 14 days 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 pound green slicing tomatoes (or 1 1/2 pounds green cherry tomatoes)

For the Brine

  • 1 cup white distilled vinegar (5% acidity)
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt

Basic Pickling Spice Mix

  • 1 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds
  • 1 teaspoon celery seeds
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole allspice

Dilly Garlicky Pickling Spice Mix

  • 2 teaspoons dill seeds
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4 garlic cloves, peeled

Hot 'n Spicy Pickling Spice Mix

  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon Szechuan peppercorns *
  • 1 teaspoon brown mustard seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

Curried Pickling Spice Mix **

  • 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon curry powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon whole allspice
  • 3/4 inch fresh ginger, sliced into thin coins

Instructions

  1. Cut larger (slicing) tomatoes into 1/2-inch wedges, and cut smaller (cherry or grape) tomatoes in half.
  2. In a small saucepan, bring all of the brine ingredients to a boil and stir until the salt is dissolved. Remove the brine from heat.
  3. Fill a hot, clean quart jar with the pickling spice mix of your choice. Pack the jar tightly with the tomatoes.
  4. Pour the hot brine over the tomatoes, covering them completely and leaving 1/2 inch headspace. Stick a chopstick or "bubbling" tool into the jar and move it around to release any trapped air bubbles.
  5. Wipe the rim clean, seal with a lid and band, and process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes (adjusting the time for altitude as needed).
  6. Store the jar in a cool, dark place. The green tomatoes will be perfectly pickled in about two weeks. Add to sandwiches, hot dogs, burgers, steaks, potatoes, or anywhere you would normally use relish. For a unique kick, you can even top off a Bloody Mary or dirty martini with a pickled green tomato garnish!

Notes

* Szechuan peppercorns can be found at well-stocked Chinese or Vietnamese supermarkets in the spice aisle.

** When making Curried Pickled Green Tomatoes, bring the brine ingredients, brown sugar, and curry powder to a boil. Stir until the spices dissolve completely. Fill a hot, clean quart jar with cumin seeds, whole allspice, and ginger; pack the jar with tomatoes; then pour the hot brine mixture over the tomatoes.

Nutrition Information:

Yield:

8

Serving Size:

1/2 cup

Amount Per Serving: Calories: 47Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 815mgCarbohydrates: 10gFiber: 1gSugar: 7gProtein: 1g

Nutrition information isn’t always accurate.

Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Instagram

This post updated from an article that originally appeared on August 29, 2011.

More green tomato recipes you might like

About Author

I'm a plant lover, passionate road-tripper, and cookbook author whose expert advice and bestselling books have been featured in TIME, Outside, HGTV, and Food & Wine. The No-Waste Vegetable Cookbook is my latest book. Garden Betty is where I write about modern homesteading, farm-to-table cooking, and outdoor adventuring — all that encompass a life well-lived outdoors. After all, the secret to a good life is... Read more »

175 Comments

  • Nathan P
    November 10, 2014 at 11:58 pm

    HI Linda
    Love the blog. Can these recipes be used for other vegetables? Cucumbers in particular. Just entering summer down under!
    Thanks

    Reply
  • buddy
    October 18, 2014 at 4:38 pm

    Here is the recipe without the photos. Just highlight this text, copy it and then paste it into a new WORD document.

    Four Ways to Pickled Green Tomatoes
    Makes 1 quart

    Ingredients

    For every quart jar, you will need approximately 1 1/2 pounds of green cherry tomatoes.

    For the Brine
    1 cup white distilled vinegar (5% acidity)
    1 cup water
    1 tablespoon kosher salt

    Basic Pickling Spice
    1 teaspoon yellow mustard seeds
    1 teaspoon celery seeds
    1 teaspoon coriander seeds
    1/2 teaspoon black peppercorns
    1/2 teaspoon whole allspice

    Dilly Garlicky Pickling Spice
    2 teaspoons dill seeds
    1 teaspoon black peppercorns
    1 bay leaf
    4 cloves garlic, peeled

    Hot ‘n Spicy Pickling Spice
    1 teaspoon black peppercorns
    1 teaspoon Szechuan peppercorns *
    1 teaspoon brown mustard seeds
    1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
    1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes

    Curried Pickling Spice **
    1 teaspoon curry powder
    1/4 cup packed brown sugar
    1/4 teaspoon cumin seeds
    1/4 teaspoon whole allspice
    3/4 inch fresh ginger root, sliced into thin coins

    Method

    Wash, dry, and slice cherry tomatoes in half.
    In a saucepan, bring all the brine ingredients to a gentle boil.

    Fill a hot, clean quart jar with the pickling spice mix of your choice. Funnel in the tomato halves and pack the jar tightly.
    Pour the hot brine over the tomatoes, covering them completely and leaving 1/2-inch headspace. Stick a chopstick into the jar and move it around to release any trapped air bubbles (a process called “bubbling”).

    Wipe the rim clean, seal with a lid and band, and process in a boiling water bath for 15 minutes (adjust time for altitude as needed).

    Store the jar in a cool, dark place. The green tomatoes will be perfectly pickled in about three weeks. Add to sandwiches, hot dogs, burgers, steaks, potatoes, or anywhere you would normally use relish. For a unique kick, you can even top off a Bloody Mary or dirty martini with a pickled green tomato garnish!

    * Szechuan peppercorns can be found at well-stocked Chinese or Vietnamese supermarkets in the spice aisle.

    ** When making curried and pickled green tomatoes, bring the brine ingredients, curry powder, and brown sugar to a boil. Stir until the spices dissolve completely. Fill a hot, clean quart jar with cumin seeds, whole allspice, and ginger coins; pack jar with tomatoes; then pour the hot brine mixture over the tomatoes.

    Reply
  • buddy
    October 18, 2014 at 4:31 pm

    Highlight the text from each section showing the directions on the recipe page and paste each section of the text in a WORD document, you don’t need to print all the pages with the photos. Just copy each section of text above the photos and put in in order in a new document,

    Reply
  • Liz
    October 11, 2014 at 1:13 pm

    I bought “pre made” pickling spice. How much would I put in the bottom of the jar? I was thinking about 1 tbsp. maybe?

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      October 12, 2014 at 1:02 am

      A tablespoon per jar should be fine!

      Reply
  • Di
    October 5, 2014 at 1:42 pm

    Just a question… I made the basic pickling recipe…. but didn’t do the warm water bath… Is that a problem?

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      October 5, 2014 at 4:25 pm

      Not a problem at all, just stick the jar in the fridge and it will keep for a very long time. The tomatoes will stay firm this way (though the texture does start to soften after a few months).

      Reply
  • Katy Szapa
    October 2, 2014 at 9:03 am

    I’m really excited to make these but I’m finding it difficult to print off the recipe. 16 pages with all those pictures! Perhaps it would be useful to your readers to come up with a recipe card for printing purposes?

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      October 12, 2014 at 1:05 am

      Printable recipes are on my to-do list, and I hope to implement them on the blog in the near future! I appreciate your patience!

      Reply
  • Heather
    October 1, 2014 at 5:18 am

    Hi, I’m wondering if I can use the whole cherry tomato without cutting them in half? Thank you heather

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      October 1, 2014 at 3:29 pm

      Yes, you can leave them whole, just wouldn’t be able to pack as many into a jar.

      Reply
  • picklemecute
    September 3, 2014 at 7:57 pm

    Thank you very much for your recipes! My Grandma used to make green tomato pickles and since she has passed I have never been able to find a good recipe. I will use yours. I too am overflowing with green cherry tomatos! Thanks again

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      September 4, 2014 at 2:00 pm

      You’re welcome, I hope they turn out just as good as your grandma’s!

      Reply
  • Radhapriya Elise McCabe
    August 24, 2014 at 6:17 am

    Could i use full size green tomatoes & chop them
    In quartered or smaller wedges depending on the size of tomato?

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      August 24, 2014 at 12:47 pm

      Yes, I often do that with larger tomatoes. Just keep the wedges or slices thick enough (at least 1/2 inch) so they won’t break apart in the brine.

      Reply
  • Rachel
    August 18, 2014 at 2:31 pm

    Oh my god! Not to dis your recipe but it’s not exactly written in the most organized way, as it really should be when canning! For the curried tomatoes, I forgot the salt in the brine, is there any way I can still add the salt after I have already processed them in the water bath?

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      August 19, 2014 at 2:10 pm

      Hi, the very first part of the ingredient list clearly states that salt is needed for the brine. With any recipe, it’s a good idea to gather all your ingredients first before you start.

      In this particular brine (vinegar-based), the salt is for flavoring so you do not need to add it after the fact (unless you want to). Either way, you should not process these pickles twice in a boiling water bath.

      Reply
      • Rachel
        August 20, 2014 at 1:00 pm

        I think that the salt is not just for flavoring when pickling vegetables, it’s more for creating a hostile environment that microorganisms can’t grow in.

        Reply
        • Linda Ly
          August 20, 2014 at 3:13 pm

          That would be true if you were using salt in a lacto-fermented pickle recipe; however in this recipe, the vinegar provides a hostile, acidic environment to inhibit bad bacteria. In vinegar-based pickling brines, the salt is not the key to safe food preservation. Just make sure you use distilled vinegar (5% acidity) and do not alter the amount of vinegar called for.

          Reply
      • Rachel
        August 20, 2014 at 1:03 pm

        What I meant is that this recipe isn’t really set up in an orderly way. I have been canning for years now and know that a good canning recipe should always be written in an organized way to ensure that all the proper canning/sterilizing procedures are done by the letter. For the sake of your subscribers, you should consider writing the recipes out so that the steps are in a more organized way.

        Reply
        • Linda Ly
          August 20, 2014 at 3:49 pm

          Printable one-page recipes are a feature I hope to implement on the site in the near future!

          As for proper canning/sterilizing procedures, it is assumed that readers know the basics of boiling water bath canning before beginning.

          Reply
          • Rachel
            August 20, 2014 at 9:26 pm

            I know how to can, I’ve been canning for years, and after trying a lot of canning recipes, I noticed this particular recipe is not as organized as it should be. Albeit, most of the recipes I’ve used have been Ball recipes or recipes from the National Home Preservation Association etc. Their canning recipes are extremely incremental, which is no doubt to ensure the best end product.

    • Marg
      September 11, 2014 at 10:19 am

      Umm, brine means ‘salt in water’.
      If you forgot it, hey that happens to the best of us but it’s pretty clearly laid out.

      Reply
  • rachel
    August 18, 2014 at 11:26 am

    Just wondering…I noticed a few posts that the tomatoes come out a little on the mushy side. Maybe if they were salted and left in the frig for a few hours to drain the liquid from them, they would turn out crisper?

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      August 19, 2014 at 1:56 pm

      No, these are meant to be soft pickles, not crisp pickles. For crisp pickles, you would need to skip the boiling water bath and simply refrigerate your jar after filling it.

      Reply
      • Rachel
        August 20, 2014 at 12:58 pm

        I have made crisp pickles with a boiling water bath. There are tons of traditional canning recipes out there that produce crisp pickles and actually, I found a few canning recipes that require salting to green tomatoes overnight before proceeding to can. That said, I think it’s safe to say that salting the tomatoes beforehand, could be an option in your recipe. I just wish I had found the other recipes for canning pickled green tomatoes before using this one — I’m afraid I may have ruined about 10 pounds.

        Reply
        • Linda Ly
          August 20, 2014 at 3:33 pm

          There are definitely plenty of crisp pickle recipes out there, and the level of crispness depends on the vegetable. I’ve made this recipe many times with various types of green tomatoes, and they sometimes stay firm and sometimes turn tender.

          Salting the tomatoes helps draw out the moisture, but they still won’t be as crunchy as raw tomatoes after processing, if that’s what you’re after. If you don’t want to make refrigerator pickles (which will keep the tomatoes as crisp as they started out), you can try adding a product like Pickle Crisp before canning them.

          Reply
          • Ned Dragston
            October 30, 2015 at 3:45 pm

            This Rachel is a troll. Ban her!

        • Ned Dragston
          October 30, 2015 at 3:45 pm

          Geez for someone who is tapping into someone else’s knowledge base and someone, btw, offering this up for free, you sure are rude.

          Reply
  • rachel
    August 18, 2014 at 9:18 am

    I want to do the curried version of these pickles…just wondering if you used a certain type of curry?

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      August 19, 2014 at 1:57 pm

      I used Madras curry, but any type of curry powder works — use your favorite!

      Reply
  • Sashont Crisp
    August 5, 2014 at 6:08 pm

    I went with the pressure canner for a longer storage life… ended up mushy 🙁 Will have to try the boil method next time! Love the different pickling options though so can’t wait to try some of the other options. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      August 6, 2014 at 5:13 pm

      I’ve never used a pressure canner so I don’t know what kind of difference it makes, but I can tell you that I’ve kept a sealed jar of these green tomatoes (that were boiling-water-canned) for over two years and they were no different from the jars I opened sooner.

      Reply
    • Concerned dad
      October 16, 2016 at 8:40 am

      Pressure canning does not extend the shelf life of anything canned vs water bath. it is used when acid levels are not high enough and to kill potential bacteria and bad microbes at a higher temperature internally. Water bath temperature is boiling temp 212 degrees. Pressure canners get up to 240 degrees (both at sea level) Low acid foods such as meat and plain vegetables need this higher temperature but anything using vinegar becomes a high acid food (when proper measurements are used)

      Reply
    • Linda Ly of Garden Betty
      October 17, 2016 at 11:52 pm

      Apologies for missing this comment when you first posted it, but as Concerned Dad has already mentioned, pressure canning does not extend the shelf life. I hope you’ve had a chance to try the other pickling options and had success with the water bath canning!

      Reply
  • Laura Lynn Piascik
    July 25, 2014 at 1:15 pm

    wonderful site:) i might of overcooked, my tomatoes. they are mushier, but still look good :)t

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      July 26, 2014 at 8:20 pm

      Thank you Laura! These pickles aren’t meant to be crisp; mine turn soft after canning.

      Reply
  • Chris
    July 20, 2014 at 7:15 pm

    How many tomato plants do you have to get 55lbs of cherry tomatoes?

    Reply
  • Debbie
    June 15, 2014 at 12:11 pm

    I pickled green tomatoes and ours for the first time with your recipes. I packed the jars; but, after the hot water bath, I had at least an inch of space at the bottom of each jar … The tomatoes and okra are floating. I don’t understand this. Each jar made a ping sound as it seal while cooling. Why do I have space at the bottom of the jar, and how can I eliminate this?

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      June 17, 2014 at 4:05 pm

      The tomatoes floating in brine are normal; it simply meant you hadn’t packed them in that tightly. When I pack my jars, I usually shake the tomatoes around a bit so they settle. As long as your jars are properly sealed, any tomatoes bobbing above the surface will be fine. Make sure you refrigerate any opened jars.

      Reply
  • natalie
    May 5, 2014 at 9:26 pm

    Hey Linda, I am new to your site and really love it all! I did want to ask a random question about the basket the green tomatoes are in. where did you get this or was it self made?

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      May 8, 2014 at 10:35 pm

      Thank you Natalie! The basket was a gift, but many corner grocers in San Francisco sell it (which is where mine came from). Online, I think it’s called an African market basket.

      Reply
      • natalie
        May 9, 2014 at 7:03 pm

        Thank you Linda! Again your site it truly awesome!!!

        Reply
  • Angie Cama
    January 19, 2014 at 3:23 pm

    Hello, these look delicious. Just wondering if they stay firm with the basic recipe? I don’t like it when they go soft 🙂

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      January 19, 2014 at 8:59 pm

      No, these are soft pickles. If you want the tomatoes firm, you can skip the water bath canning and simply store them in the fridge.

      Reply
      • Nicole
        June 27, 2014 at 11:23 am

        Do you stick them in the fridge immediately after you’ve canned them? Will they cure that way?

        Reply
        • Linda Ly
          July 2, 2014 at 2:50 pm

          Once they’ve been water bath canned, they are shelf stable. I don’t refrigerate until I open the jars.

          Reply
  • Eduardo
    October 31, 2013 at 4:14 pm

    Hello, great recipe!
    I’m from mexico and down here the green tomatoes are called tomatillo. According to wikipedia, there is a difference between Mexican green tomato (tomatillo) and green tomatoes which appears in your photos. do you know if you can use them for this recipe?

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      November 1, 2013 at 10:53 pm

      Tomatillos are indeed different from green tomatoes here in the US (not to mention, we also have tomatillos that are purple instead of green). Our green tomatoes usually mean unripe tomatoes. However, I don’t see why you can’t substitute tomatillos in this recipe!

      Reply
  • Maree
    October 18, 2013 at 3:47 pm

    I have a great recipe for salsa which calls for pickling salt, but all I could find was pickle crisp. Would this be okay to use in my salsa recipe? Thanks?

    Reply
  • Stacey
    October 17, 2013 at 11:00 am

    I want to try the garlic dill ones but I don’t have any dill seeds. Would just the regular dill weed ‘leaves’ work? If so, how much? Would I just sub them out 1:1?

    And if I did the curry ones, would it work with ground cumin? I have the whole allspice but not whole cumin.

    Thanks! I can’t wait to try these! We have all kids of green tomatoes and I’d rather not just let them sit in the garage to ripen, aka rot. 🙂

    Reply
    • Stacey
      October 17, 2013 at 11:01 am

      I should clarify on the dill – dried dill that most everyone has in their cupboard is what I’m referring to. Thanks!

      Reply
    • Linda Ly
      October 17, 2013 at 4:04 pm

      I have never subbed dried dill weed for dill seed, but I’d guess you need to use at least 2-3x more dill weed to impart the same flavor. However, keep in mind that heat brings out the flavor of dill seed more; with such a long processing time, I’m not sure dill weed (which is more delicate and herb-like, instead of spice-like) would hold up flavor-wise. You’ll have to experiment with this.

      For the curried recipe, yes you can use ground cumin, but you’ll need to taste the brine and add more ground cumin until the flavor’s to your liking. Start with 1/2 the amount of cumin seeds called for.

      Reply
  • ildi
    October 9, 2013 at 4:53 am

    Thank you so much for the recipes! You are amazing!!!

    Reply
  • Nicole
    October 4, 2013 at 4:03 pm

    This recipe looks excellent. Can you can these using a pressure canner? What # pressure and for how long?

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      October 4, 2013 at 4:42 pm

      Unfortunately I’m not familiar with pressure canning; you should consult with your canner manual or state extension for the proper procedures.

      Reply
      • Nicole
        October 4, 2013 at 5:58 pm

        No worries; thanks again for the recipe.

        Reply
  • mike
    October 4, 2013 at 2:33 pm

    I’m trying out the basic and the hot and spicy recipe for my first foray into pickling. I’ll let you know how it goes…in about three weeks! 🙂

    Reply
    • mike
      October 25, 2013 at 12:46 pm

      I’m back! After 3 weeks, I declare it a success. The pickled ones tasted as expected but the hot and spicy? Very tangy with a subtly hot aftertaste. Thanks for the recipes 🙂

      Reply
      • Angie Cama
        January 19, 2014 at 3:20 pm

        Hello, did the tomatoes stay firm?

        Reply
        • mike
          January 20, 2014 at 8:46 am

          Hi Angie, yes they did. The tomatoes were firm and sliced well without smushing, so pretty successful overall.

          Reply
  • JennAk
    October 4, 2013 at 11:52 am

    Love your site! Thanks for the recipes. I did three of the four (didn’t do the spicy one). I brought them to work and the garlic dill was a hit! I had enough tomatoes for 12 pint jars and 4 quart jars. I will definitely be using the garlic dill next year! Thanks again!

    Reply
    • Linda Ly
      October 4, 2013 at 1:59 pm

      You’re welcome! Glad you enjoyed!

      Reply
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